Hardware Inventory

SQL Server Inventory using ConfigMgr

The hardware inventor feature of ConfigMgr helps us discover and track several items. One recurring item is SQL Server and by default there is no nice way of tracking this. Basically the only option out of the box is using the application inventory to find where SQL server is installed. However this usualy results in a large list with mixed servers and clients and you still have no idea if its running SQLExpress, Standard or Enterprise edtion.

So what can we do to fix this besides buy a third party solution. Well the good thing is that SQL stores all the information into WMI, this means we can track editions, installations and versions with a bit of trickery with the hardware inventory engine.

There are number of steps included here at it is important to follow all of them for a successful result.

Step 1 – Update Configuration.mof

The first part of this is updateing configuration.mof. This file will control classes that inventoried and then index into the database.

The file can be a bit tricky to find if you have never done this before. You need to go to this location <Your ConfigMgr Install folder>\Inboxes\clifiles.src\hinv

In here is the configuration.mof file, now first make a backup copy of the file in case you want to revert the changes later and don’t want edit the file again.

At the very end of the file there is a section for adding custom extensions.

//========================

// Added extensions start

//========================

//========================

// Added extensions end

//========================

In between these block we need to add the following

//———————————————

// SQL 2017 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement14”}, dynamic,
Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql17

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//———————————————

// SQL 2016 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement13”}, dynamic,
Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql16

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//———————————————

// SQL 2014 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement12”}, dynamic,
Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql14

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//———————————————

// SQL 2012 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement11”}, dynamic,
Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql12

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//———————————————

// SQL 2008 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement10”}, dynamic,
Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql08

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//———————————————

// SQL 2000/2005 Properties

//———————————————

[Union, ViewSources{“select IsReadOnly,PropertyIndex,PropertyName,PropertyNumValue,PropertyStrValue,PropertyValueType,
ServiceName,SqlServiceType from sqlServiceAdvancedProperty”},ViewSpaces{“\\\\.\\root\\microsoft\\sqlserver\\computermanagement”}, dynamic,Provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”)]

class cm_sql2kand05

{
[PropertySources{“IsReadOnly”}        ] boolean IsReadOnly;
[PropertySources{“PropertyIndex”},key ] uint32 PropertyIndex;
[PropertySources{“PropertyName”},key  ] string PropertyName;
[PropertySources{“PropertyNumValue”}  ] uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyStrValue”}  ] string PropertyStrValue;
[PropertySources{“PropertyValueType”} ] uint32 PropertyValueType;
[PropertySources{“ServiceName”},key   ] string ServiceName;
[PropertySources{“SqlServiceType”},key] uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

Save the configuration.mof file

Done! On to step two.

Step 2 – Import hardware inventory information

The next step is done in the console and you need some nice permissions to do this. You will need to edit the default client settings object.

First thing is first. So we need to create a custom mof file to import. To do this, copy the following and save it as SQLProperties.mof (pick a nice location, like the desktop).

//=================SQL 2017 Information

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL17 Property”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL17_Property|1.0”)]

class cm_sql17 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//=================SQL 2016 Information

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL16 Property”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL16_Property|1.0”)]

class cm_sql16 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//=================SQL 2014 Information

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL14 Property”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL14_Property|1.0”)]

class cm_sql14 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//=================SQL 2012 Information

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL12 Property”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL12_Property|1.0”)]

class cm_sql12 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//=================SQL 2008 Information

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL Property”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL_Property|2.0”)]

class cm_sql08 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

//==================SQL Information 2000 and 2005

[dynamic, provider(“MS_VIEW_INSTANCE_PROVIDER”),

SMS_Report(TRUE),

SMS_Group_Name(“SQL Property Legacy”),

SMS_Class_ID(“CUSTOM|SQL_Property_Legacy|2.0”)]

class cm_sql2kand05 : SMS_Class_Template

{
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  boolean IsReadOnly;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 PropertyIndex;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string PropertyName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyNumValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  string PropertyStrValue;
[SMS_Report(TRUE)    ]  uint32 PropertyValueType;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  string ServiceName;
[SMS_Report(TRUE),key]  uint32 SqlServiceType;

};

Next, head on over to the Administration workspace in the ConfigMgr console and find the Client Settings in the menu to the left. Open up the Default Client Settings and check the Hardware Inventory tab.

There is a nice little button named Set Classes, hit that and then hit import. Browse to the SQLProperties.mof file and hit Open.

You will be greated by this screen where you need to make sure the Import both hardware inventory classes and hardware inventory class settings is selected

sqlinv02

If you are like me and don’t want this inventory to hit each and every device you have deselect the following classes in your default settings. If you are only using the default client settings object, please skip to the next step.

sqlinv01

If you are using custom client settings, please add the above classes to be included in hardware inventory under the same tabe as we did the import.

This means SQL information will now be imorted into the database! We can now create collections based on this, please do leave enough time for hardware inventory to run on each client before you find data in the database.

Step 3 – The Report

For me the last piece of the pussel is to create a custom report to easily show me the information needed. I will not cover the details of how to create a custom reports as the options are plenty. However I will share the query used to get a nice detailed view with the server and edition info.

Note that this is a simple report and can be extended in a lot of ways and if you are already using PowerBI you can extract the same data that way.

Query used:

— SQL 2017

select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql6.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.0%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql6.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql6.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql6.PropertySTRValue0 end)  as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql6.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql6.PropertyNUMValue0 end)  as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql6.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql6.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql6.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql6.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_SQL17_Property0 sql6 on sys1.ResourceID=sql6.ResourceID

where

sql6.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

union

— SQL 2016

select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql5.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.0%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql5.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql5.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql5.PropertySTRValue0 end)  as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql5.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql5.PropertyNUMValue0 end)  as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql5.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql5.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql5.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql5.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_SQL16_Property0 sql5 on sys1.ResourceID=sql5.ResourceID

where

sql5.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

union

— SQL 2014

select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql4.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.0%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql4.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql4.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql4.PropertySTRValue0 end)  as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql4.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql4.PropertyNUMValue0 end)  as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql4.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql4.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql4.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql4.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_SQL14_Property0 sql4 on sys1.ResourceID=sql4.ResourceID

where

sql4.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

union

— SQL 2012

select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql3.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.0%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql3.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql3.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql3.PropertySTRValue0 end)  as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql3.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql3.PropertyNUMValue0 end)  as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql3.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql3.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql3.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql3.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_SQL12_Property0 sql3 on sys1.ResourceID=sql3.ResourceID

where

sql3.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

union

— SQL 2008

Select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql2.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.0%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql2.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql2.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql2.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql2.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql2.PropertyNUMValue0 end) as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql2.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql2.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql2.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql2.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_sql_property_2_00 sql2 on sys1.resourceid=sql2.ResourceID

where

sql2.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

union

— SQL 2005

Select

sys1.Netbios_name0 as [Computer Name]

,max(Case sql1.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
(case
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘9.%’ then ‘SQL 2005’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ‘10.5%’ then ‘SQL 2008 R2’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ’10.%’ then ‘SQL 2008’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ’11.%’ then ‘SQL 2012’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ’12.%’ then ‘SQL 2014’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ’14.%’ then ‘SQL 2016’
when sql1.PropertySTRValue0 like ’16.%’ then ‘SQL 2017’
else ‘SQL Other’ End)
end) as [SQL]

,max(Case sql1.PropertyName0 when ‘SKUName’ then
sql1.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Type]

,max(Case sql1.PropertyName0 when ‘SPLEVEL’ then
sql1.PropertyNUMValue0 end) as [SQL Service Pack]

,max(Case sql1.PropertyName0 when ‘VERSION’ then
sql1.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL Version]

,max(Case sql1.PropertyName0 when ‘FILEVERSION’ then
sql1.PropertySTRValue0 end) as [SQL CU Version]

from v_r_system sys1

left join v_gs_custom_sql_property_legacy_2_00 sql1 on sys1.ResourceID=sql1.ResourceID

where sql1.PropertyName0 in (‘SKUNAME’,’SPLevel’,’version’,’fileversion’)

group by sys1.Netbios_name0

This might not be the prettiest query every created or the smartest way (there are alot smarter people out there) so don’t go flaming it’s not optimized. It does the job : )

/Peter

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ConfigMgr–Extending Hardware Inventory

So if you are using ConfigMgr you probably know that you can extend hardware inventory to inventory pretty much anything. The cool thing is that by almost default there are two classes that are really nice to have.

The first being Win32_QuickFixEngineering which is a WMI class listing all installed patches. Having that inventoried means you can build collections based on missing or certain patches installed which when it comes to critical patches or hotfixes are really nice.

The second is a kind of custom class and its called Microsoft_BDD_Info and it is created by ZTITatoo.wsf when you deploy a computer with either MDT or ConfigMgr with MDT integration. This includes a bunch of information from the deployment. For instance it lists which sequence ID was run and the timestamp. So if you inventory this you can keep collections based on what sequences was used and if you have a nice version control in your sequence you now find all your computer that where deployed with a certain version of sequence.

So how do you enable this awesomeness? Well its pretty simple. Fire off your ConfigMgr console and check under Administration and Client settings. You will have a setting called Default Client Settings. Open it up and on the left hand click Hardware inventory. Next click the button to the right where it says Classes. You will be presented with a long list of WMI classes that can be enabled and disabled. At the top just do a search for “Quick” and select the class Win32_QuickFixEngineering.

QuickFix

To enabled the second class a bit more work is required but don’t worry it is not hard. Go back to the client settings (if you left it) and click the Add button seen at the bottom (look at the image above for guidance). You now need to connect to a computer that has been deployed using MDT/ConfigMgr+MDT so click the connect button and type in the computer name and credentials if needed.

HardwareClass

When connected you will see all the WMI classes available on that computer. Just find the one called Microsoft_BDD_Info and select it and click OK when done.

BDD_info

So now they have both been selected and you have saved the Clients Settings by clicking OK all the way out. Now all that remains is waiting for the next hardware inventory to complete and you can start using the values collected.

Happy deploying!

/Peter